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MoreSplashHits predicts NL All-Star players for 2015 midsummer’s classic

Buster Posey has experience with big hits in Cincinnati.

Buster Posey has experience with big hits in Cincinnati.

The starters for the 2015 All-Star Game in Cincinnati will be announced Sunday night, with the reserves announced on Monday.

So there’s still time for MoreSplashHits to make our predictions.

These predictions are based on the notion that the leaders released earlier this week will remain unchanged. That is unlikely to happen.

Usually, there is a huge surge in voting in the final days which can have a big impact on the final results.

The closest vote is at third base, where Matt Carpenter of the Cardinals held a narrow lead over Todd Frazier of the Reds.

But, again, we base these picks on the latest standings. We’ll throw in caveats at the bottom

STARTERS, BASED ON FAN VOTING RELEASED ON JUNE 30

C – Buster Posey, SF
1B – Paul Goldschmidt, Arz
2B – Dee Gordon, Mia
SS – Jhonny Peralta, StL
3B – Matt Carpenter, StL
OF – Bryce Harper, Was
OF – Giancarlo Stanton, Mia
OF – Matt Holliday, StL

RESERVES, SELECTED BY PLAYERS

C – Yadier Molina, StL
1B – Adrian Gonzalez, LA
2B – Howie Kendrick, LA
SS – Troy Tulowitzki, Col
3B – Todd Frazier, Cin
OF – Andrew McCutcheon, Pit
OF – Ryan Braun, Mil
OF – Joc Pederson, LA
SP – Max Scherzer, Was
SP – Gerrit Cole, Pit
SP – Michael Wacha, StL
SP – Zach Greinke, LA
SP – Madison Bumgarner, SF
RP – Trevor Rosenthal, StL
RP – Mark Melancon, Pit
RP – Aroldis Chapman, CIn

MANAGERS’ PICKS

P – Shelby Miller, Atl
P – Jacob deGrom, NY
P – Jonathan Papelbon, Phi
P – AJ Burnett, Pit
P – Matt Harvey, NY
PP – Justin Upton, SD
PP – Anthony Rizzo, Chi
PP – Nolan Arenado, Col
PP – Francisco Cervelli, Pit

None of the starting pitchers selected here as scheduled to pitch the Sunday before the All-Star Game, which would disqualify them from participating. So it would appear there would be few all-star replacements.

I really think Giants manager Bruce Bochy would like to select Brandon Crawford to the team. But it looks like that will be contigent on Matt Carpenter winning the fan vote. If Frazier wins the fan vote, as he should, then that allows the players to pick the deserving Nolan Arenado, and opens a spot for Bochy to take Crawford.

The manager only gets to pick four position players. Under this scenario, I have Bochy taking Justin Upton and Anthony Rizzo (both deserving) as their teams’ lone representative. I have Bochy taking Arenado, as a deserving player, and Cervelli as the third catcher. I’m sure Bochy does not want Buster Posey catching more than three innings, creating a need for a third catcher. In Bochy’s previous two All-Star games as manager with the Giants, he took three catchers, although in 2013 he took his third catcher as an injury replacement for a non-catcher.

He could do that again to get Crawford on the team.

As far as other Giants go, the only other player with a shot of making the team is second baseman Joe Panik. If Bochy can get Crawford on the team, looking for Bochy to nominate Panik as one of the five players to be candidates for the fans Final Vote.

Also look for the Nationals’ Denard Span and Pirates’ Starling Marte to be added to the roster for the injured Matt Holliday and Giancarlo Stanton.

Peavy, Lollis and maybe Osich join San Francisco Giants active roster

Jake Peavy

Jake Peavy

I didn’t know there was anything wrong with Tim Hudson.

He’s going on the disabled list.

I do know there’s something wrong with Santiago Casilla.

He is NOT going on the disabled list.

As the San Francisco Giants arrived in Washington D.C. for a weekend series with the Nationals, a bevy of roster moves followed them.

As expected, Jake Peavy was activated from the disabled list after spending more than two months there recovering from a back strain that plagued him in spring training.

Hudson was placed on the DL with a right shoulder strain. He’s also battled a sore hip. But basically, the official diagnosis is that Hudson is suffering from heiskindofoldsowewillgivehimabreakitis.

In a more surprising move, the Giants designated Travis Ishikawa for assignment about week after the hero of the NLCS was called up from Sacramento. Ishikawa was 0 for 5 with a walk in his most recent stint.

It’s the second time this season Ishikawa has been DFA’d. Assuming he clears waivers — again — Ishikawa likely will head back to Sacramento.

Taking his place on the roster will be outfielder Ryan Lollis.

Lollis will be making his major league debut after seven seasons in the Giants’ farm system. The 28-year-old was drafted in the 37th round of the 2009 draft by the Giants.

Lollis was hitting .358 with a very impressive .431 OBP through three levels of the minors this season. With Triple-A Sacramento, Lollis was hitting .353 with a .422 OBP in 116 PAs over 32 games. He has two home runs and 11 RBI, and can play all three outfield positions, something Ishikawa could not.

Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle also reported that relief pitcher Josh Osich was in Washington, although an official move has not been announced.

Schulman reports that Casilla, who blew a two-run lead Wednesday without recording an out, will not be going on the DL. Manager Bruce Bochy will give Casilla a couple of days off to rest a sore shoulder.

The Giants will need to create room for Osich not only on the 25-man active roster, but also the 40-man roster, as Osich is not currently on the 40-man list.

Recent busts in international market temper excitement on Giants’ signing of Lucius Fox

MoreSplashHits has broken its blogging silence, to commemorate the return of Matt Cain to the starting rotation.

Lucius Fox

Lucius Fox

There was news Thursday, other than Cain’s return to the mound. The Giants made a rare big splash into the international prospect market with the signing of infielder Lucius Fox of The Bahamas.

Baseball America ranked Lucius Fox as the No. 4 international prospect in 2015.

Fox, 18, is a 6-foot, 160-pound middle infielder and switch hitter. He played for American Heritage High in Delray Beach, Fla., and committed to play for North Carolina State.

A 2015 Perfect Game third-team All-American, Fox was born in the Bahamas but spent 2-plus years playing high school ball in Florida before returns to his native island in May. He won his petition to be declared an international free agent.

Fox is considered an excellent athlete and sure-handed fielder with a strong arm. He’s a high-contact hitter who lacks power. He could develop into a big-league middle infielder, but could also play in the outfield.

San Francisco Chronicle writer Henry Schulman reported that Fox signed for $6 million, meaning the Giants likely won’t be able to make another big splash in the international free agent market over the next couple of years.

The Giants beat out teams like the Dodgers to get Fox. While it’s great to see the Giants active in this market, it’s hard to get overly excited.

The Giants’ most recent international signings haven’t really worked out.

Last year, the Giants signed Cuban outfielder Daniel Carbonell for $3.175 million. Carbonell was 23 when he signed last season.

He had a solid first season in the Giants’ farm system, hitting .336 with .384 OBP in 31 games, mostly with Class A San Jose.

But he has struggled big time this season for Double-A Richmond. He’s hitting just .146 in 206 ABs in 56 games with 53 strikeouts to only four walks.

The Giants’ other big international signing in recent history was Angel Villalona. The first baseman was signed as a 16-year-old out of the Dominican Republic in 2007.

After some solid seasons in the lower minor leagues, Villalona had his career sidetracked for more than two seasons when he was implicated in the shooting death of a man in his native Dominican Republic.

Since returning to baseball, Villaona hist .231 between Class A and AA in 2013 and .227 for Double-A Richmond last season.

Now 24, Villalona was dropped from the Giants’ 40-man roster. He’s currently hitting .171 with no home runs and 8 RBI in 76 ABs for Richmond.

Correct call made in Giants-Dodgers game despite gaffe of third-base coach Roberto Kelly

From left, Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly argues with third base umpire Fieldin Culbreth as San Francisco Giants third base coach Roberto Kelly and Gregor Blanco wait for resolution in the ninth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 22, 2015, in San Francisco. San Francisco won, 3-2. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

From left, Los Angeles Dodgers manager Don Mattingly argues with third base umpire Fieldin Culbreth as San Francisco Giants third base coach Roberto Kelly and Gregor Blanco wait for resolution in the ninth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 22, 2015, in San Francisco. San Francisco won, 3-2. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Dodgers manager Don Mattingly had a legitmate beef on Wednesday night.

But, ultimately, the correct call was made in the bizarre play involving Giants third-base coach Roberto Kelly and Gregor Blanco in the ninth inning.

OK, let’s set up the play.

With runners on first and second and one out in the ninth of a 2-2 tie, Brandon Belt shot a single into left field. Blanco, on second base, got a late break on the line drive and had no intention on trying to score as he rounded third base.

But as he rounded the base, Blanco bumped into Kelly, who was standing about six feet from the base.

Mattingly came out to argue interference with third-base umpire and crew chief Fieldin Culbreth, as Blanco clearly came in contatct with Kelly.

“The third-base coach blocked him,” Mattingly said. “I guess that’s the way I’ve been taught – the third-base coach is not allowed to block the runner from continuing on. It’s obviously interference and they missed the call, basically. I don’t know who was supposed to be watching but they weren’t.”

He continued: “He didn’t see it. He was watching the play. I don’t know why the third-base ump is watching the play. There’s nothing for him to watch. It’s a ground ball to left. I don’t know who’s watching to see if he touched the base. I really don’t know what the umpires’ responsibilities are there. But I do know there’s no way in baseball they allow the third-base coach to come up and basically block the runner from going forward, and that’s what happened tonight. That’s obviously a missed call. It’s not reviewable from their explanation.”

It seems that the Dodgers’ main beef is based on the idea that Culbreth didn’t see the play, because he wasn’t looking. And he wasn’t.

filedn

But let’s take a look at the facts.

  • FACT: Blanco bumped into Kelly.
  • FACT: Culbreth didn’t see it.
  • FACT: Blanco was not attempting to score.
  • FACT: Kelly did not prevent Blanco from attempting to score, not did he assist him in getting back to third
  • FACT: There was no play at third base by the Dodgers.

So, it would appear that the Dodgers were hoping to get bailed out of a ninth-inning jam not by a play that they made, but by a technicality or an umpire’s interpretation.

But one problem. Here’s the rule concerning the play from the MLB rulebook.

Rule 7.09
It is interference by a batter or runner when …
(g) In the judgment of the umpire, the base coach at third base, or first base, by touching or holding the runner, physically assists him in returning to or leaving third base or first base.

So, by the rule, Culbreth’s ruling was correct.

“Don came out and asked me did I see him grab him,” Culbreth said “I told him no, I did not see him grab him. . . . The rule is pretty specific in the fact that he had to touch and physically grab him and assist him in returning to the base. That did not happen. If he doesn’t physically assist him in returning to the base then there’s no interference.”

Blanco concurred: “It wasn’t like he stopped me. I was stopping on third. I don’t feel he was stopping me at all.”

The problem comes in that some umpires would have seen the contact and ruled Blanco out … simply on the basis of stupidity.

There is absolutely no reason for Kelly to be standings THAT close to third base. There is no reason for contact to ever happen in that circumstance.

But it’s another example of a learning curve for Kelly, who made the move from first-base coach to third-base coach to replace the retired Tim Flannery.

You may remember on Opening Day, Kelly got Nori Aoki thrown out with a late stop sign.

On that play, Aoki was rounding third on a double by Joe Panik, when Kelly threw up a late stop sign. That led to Aoki to get caught too far off of third base. He was thrown out in the resulting rundown.

Not surprising, a few days later Aoki scored on a play when he blew threw a Kelly stop sign.

Kelly’s still learning his new job. Hopefully, it doesn’t cost the Giants in the future.

Tim Lincecum gets new haircut and look back to many sides of Timmy

Tim Lincecum's new haircut on Friday, via Instagram

Tim Lincecum’s new haircut on Friday, via Instagram

The Giants have lost their first four home games of 2015.

The Giants have lost seven straight games overall.

The Giants, at 3-8, are off to one of the worst starts by a defending World Series champion in history.

So what is there to blog about?

Well, Tim Lincecum’s hair, of course!

The Giants right-hander lopped off his long mane for a more slick-back look on Friday.

So we thought it might be a good time to look back on the many sides of Timmy through the years.

You’ve gotta Timmy, the first-round draft pick in 2006.

timdraft

And Timmy in 2008, the first of his two Cy Young years.

tim2008

Timmy hoisting the first of his World Series trophies, in 2010.

2010WS

Timmy at his second World Series parade in 2012.

World Series Giants Parade Baseball

The clean-cut Timmy, with glasses to boot in 2013.

tim2013

And the mustachio’d Timmy in 2014.

timm2014

The San Franciso Giants’ 0-3 home start is not their worst ever … yet

Colorado Rockies' Nolan Arenado, left, rounds the bases after his three-run home run off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum, right, during the first inning of a baseball game on Wednesday, April 15, 2015, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Colorado Rockies’ Nolan Arenado, left, rounds the bases after his three-run home run off San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum, right, during the first inning of a baseball game on Wednesday, April 15, 2015, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

The San Francisco lost on Wednesday … again. It was their sixth straight loss, their third straight at home.

Fans at AT&T Park haven’t been able to cheer a win in 2015. And you’re probably wondering if their 0-3 start the Giants’ worst home start ever.

Well, the answer is no. In fact, it’s not even the worst start in their current home park.

Back in 2000, the opening season in the Giants’ home by the bay — then Pacific Bell Park — the Giants opened the home season by being swept by the Dodgers in three games.

Then the Giants lost two more to the Arizona Diamondbacks to end their first homestand of the year at 0-5.

They went on the road, came back and lost to the Montreal Expos, pushing their home record to 0-6.

The Giants won their first game at Pacific Bell Park on April 29.

So let’s hope the 2015 Giants aren’t looking for their first home win on April 29.

But, again, here’s a silver lining.

The 2000 Giants rebounded from the poor home start to win 97 games and the National League West Division championship.

Giants open home schedule with fewest runs scored since 1911

San Francisco Giants' Angel Pagan, right, scores past Colorado Rockies catcher Nick Hundley on a sacrifice fly by Matt Duffy during the eighth inning of a baseball game on Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

San Francisco Giants’ Angel Pagan, right, scores past Colorado Rockies catcher Nick Hundley on a sacrifice fly by Matt Duffy during the eighth inning of a baseball game on Tuesday, April 14, 2015, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

The San Francisco Giants’ offensive ineptness has reached historic levels.

Monday’s loss to the Colorado Rockies in the home opener was just the ninth time in franchise history, dating back to 1883, that the Giants have been shut out in their home opener, and only the third time in San Francisco Giants history.

The Giants looked like they might set a franchise record by being shut out in their first two home contests.

The Giants didn’t push across their first run at home this season until the eighth inning in a 4-1 loss to the Rockies on Tuesday.

Of course, it took two outs for the Giants to get a run home. After the Giants put the first two runners on in the eighth, Angel Pagan alertly advanced to third on an incredible catch by Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado in foul territory. Pagan scored on a more traditional sacrifice fly to the outfield by Matt Duffy.

The 16 consecutive scoreless innings to open the home schedule are the most by the Giants since 1914.

Five of the previous eight times the Giants have been shutout at home occurred before 1914 (1890, 1907, 1909, 1911, 1913). Baseball reference does list box scores before 1914, so we don’t know if 16 consecutive scoreless innings are the most in franchise history.

But we do know this: the one run scored in the Giants’ first two home games of the season tied a franchise record, matching the total from the 1911 season.

If you’re looking for good news, in 1911 the Giants won their third home game of the season and went on to capture the National League pennant.

So maybe it’s a sign. We can only hope.

Don’t worry: History shows Madison Bumgarner will be just fine in his next start

San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Madison Bumgarner throws against the San Diego Padres in the first inning of a baseball game Saturday April 11, 2015, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Madison Bumgarner throws against the San Diego Padres in the first inning of a baseball game Saturday April 11, 2015, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

 

Saturday night was a rough day for Madison Bumgarner.

MadBum got tagged for five runs on eight hits in three innings in the Giants’ 10-2 loss to the Padres.

You can already hear the talking heads and bloggers going on and on about Saturday’s game is an example of how Bumgarner is feeling the effects of last year’s deep playoff run and high number of innings pitched.

But we’ve seen this before.

Bumgarner said afterwards that his mechanics were off, causing all of his pitches to go flat. Even so, the Padres didn’t exactly light him up.

The Padres’ first-inning rally started with a broken-bat, chalk-finder double by Matt Kemp. A couple of seeing-eye singles resulted in a 2-0 lead.

In the third, more seeing-eye singles and soft liners that dropped in front of outfielders led to three more runs. In all, it was Kemp’s double and nine singles.

Not great. But let’s pump the brakes on the something-is-wrong-with-MadBum talk.

We’ll remind you that after two starts, Clayton Kershaw has a 5.84 ERA, which is worse than Bumgarner’s 5.40.

And we’ve seen this before from Bumgarner. This was Bumgarner’s ninth career start in which he allowed more earned runs than innings pitched.

And we’ve seen him bounce back.

In the eight follow-up starts that came after those rough outings, Bumgarner has gone 5-1 with a 1.11 ERA. That includes his start in the 2012 World Series when he followed up his ugly start in Game 1 of the NLCS with a gem in Game 2 of the Series.

In the one loss, Bumgarner gave up two earned runs in eight innings, but lost because the Giants didn’t score any runs.

And all eight of those follow-up starts came at home. Bumgarner’s next start will come Thursday at home against the Diamondbacks.

Here’s the breakdown of those starts:

  • Aug. 25, 2010 (Cin) — 2.2 IP, 7 ER (8 R) 7 H, 1 BB, 3 K
    Next: Aug. 31 (Col) — 6 IP, 1 ER, 5 H, 3 BB, 2 K
  • June 21, 2011 (Min) — 0.1 IP, 8 ER, 9 H, 1 K
    Next: June 26 (Cle) — 7 IP, 1 ER, 6 H, 1 BB, 11 K, win
  • July 30, 2011 (at Cin) — 4 IP, 5 ER (7 R), 7 H, 3 BB, 4 K
    Next: Aug. 4 (Phi) — 8 IP, 2 ER, 6 H, 2 BB, 9 K, loss
  • July 4, 2012 (at (Was) — 5 IP, 7 ER, 9 H, 1 BB, 7 K
    Next: July 13 (Hou) — 7 IP, 2 H, 1 ER, 2 BB, 5 K, win
  • Sep. 11, 2012 (at Col) — 4.1 IP, 5 ER, 11 H, 1 BB, 2 K,
    Next: Sept. 17 (Col) — 6 IP, 1 ER, 4 H, 5 BB, 6 K, win
  • Oct. 14, 2012 (StL) – 3.2 IP, 6 ER, 8 H, 1 BB, 2 K
    Next: Oct. 25 (Det) – 7 IP, 0 ER, 2 H, 2 BB, 8 K, win
  • May 17, 2013 (at Col) — 4.2 IP, 7 ER (9 R) 8 H, 2 BB, 4 K
    Next: May 22 (Was) — 7 IP, 1 ER, 4 H, 2 BB, 5 K
  • July 28, 2014 (Pit) — 4 IP, 5 ER, 6 H, 2 BB, 2 K
    Next: 9 IP, 0 R, 2 H, 1 BB, 10 K, win

The combined numbers from Bumgarner’s follow-up starts:

57 IP, 7 ER, 17 BB, 51 K, 5-1

So relax. MadBum will be fine.

The sticky situation between the Padres’ Derek Norris and the Giants’ Angel Pagan

Derek Norris of the Padres and Angel Pagan of the Giants

Derek Norris of the Padres and Angel Pagan of the Giants

You can call it the greatest overreaction to a piece of gum since Hedley Lamarr in Blazing Saddles.

gum

In the top of the ninth inning of a 0-0 tie, the Giants’ Angel Pagan and Padres catcher Derek Norris got into a jawing match that resulted in both dugouts being warned by home plate umpire Tripp Gibson.

But what could have sparked a near-brawl between the Giants and Padres?

“It was something really small,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. “You can ask them. It was kind of silly, to be honest. It was intense out there.”

OK. So Pagan was asked by reporters.

“It was everything for a piece of gum,” he said.

As Pagan came to bat in the ninth, he looked down in the batter’s box, picked up something small and appeared to fling it at Norris’ shinguard. Norris took offense to that and stood up to tell Pagan about it, and Pagan barked back.

Pagan said the small item was a piece of gum. He was trying to fling it away, but it stuck to his glove and hit Norris.

Afterwards Pagan said: “ That’s his game face. I respect that. … He didn’t have to take that position.”

Norris wasn’t having any of that, telling the San Diego Union-Tribune’s Dennis Lin: “He was just being kind of dickhead, and I don’t take kindly to that. … I don’t come into center field and throw gum at him when he’s playing defense.”

Derek. It was gum. GUM!!

Padres pitcher Craig Kimbrel followed that up by buzzing Pagan high and tight.

“I just happened,” Kimbrel said. “I was wild today.”

He was smiling when he said that.

But it didn’t end there. Pagan then followed by lining a 3-2 pitch into center field for a leadoff triple.

After sliding into third, Pagan celebrated loudly — in the direction of the Giants dugout, or Kimbrel, who was backing up third on the play, or both.

San Francisco Giants' Angel Pagan pumps his fist after sliding into third with a triple as umpire Greg Gibson signals safe in the ninth inning of a baseball game won 1-0 by Giants over the San Diego Padres in 12 innings Thursday, April 9, 2015, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

San Francisco Giants’ Angel Pagan pumps his fist after sliding into third with a triple as umpire Greg Gibson signals safe in the ninth inning of a baseball game won 1-0 by Giants over the San Diego Padres in 12 innings Thursday, April 9, 2015, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

Kimbrel then stared down Pagan.

But Kimbrel got the last laugh, getting Brandon Crawford to pop up and Casey McGehee to hit into an inning-ending double play with Pagan still on third.

As he was leaving the field, Kimbrel barked at Pagan.

Just another fun day at Petco Park with the Giants and the Padres.

Oh, and by the way, the Giants won 1-0 in 12 innings.

“It was a great game overall,” Pagan said. “It was a very fun game, interesting, fun. Everything.”

Chris Heston’s unlikely road to San Francisco Giants’ rotation leads to victory

San Francisco Giants' Chris Heston throws a pitch against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 8, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

San Francisco Giants’ Chris Heston throws a pitch against the Arizona Diamondbacks during the first inning of a baseball game Wednesday, April 8, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

The San Francisco Giants were in need of some good news. And it came from an unlikely source — Chris Heston.

The rookie right-hander pitched six solid innings to propel the Giants to a 5-2 win over the Arizona Diamondbacks on Wednesday.

Coming into Wednesday, the Giants were unsure of the health of Jake Peavy and Brandon Belt and placed Matt Cain on the disabled list.

Heston was called up to fill in Cain’s spot. But after Peavy looked good in his bullpen session before Wednesday’s game — putting him on course to start Sunday in San Diego — it looked as if Heston’s start Wednesday would be a spot start with Ryan Vogelsong filling Cain’s spot in the rotation after Peavy’s return.

But then Heston did what he did Wednesday. He gave up two unearned runs on three hits and two walks on 91 pitches over six innings. He was the first rookie pitcher to start a game for the Giants in the opening week of the season since Matt Cain in 2006. He became the first rookie pitcher to start and win a game in Week 1 since Kurt Ainsworth in 2003.

The first unearned run was his own fault. Heston hit A.J. Pollock with a pitch in the first inning, then allowed Pollock go to third on an errant pickoff throw. Pollock scored on a groundout.

“The first inning started to unravel a little bit, kind of a little shaky there,” Heston said. “But I was able settle down and get back into it.”

In the sixth, he gave up a laser double to Paul Goldschmidt. Goldschmidt advanced to third on a pitch (which should have been caught by Hector Sanchez) and scored on a passed ball by Sanchez.

And now it looks as if Heston will start Monday in the home opener against the Rockies.

“We’re not moving him,” manager Bruce Bochy said. “We need him right now. What a shot in the arm for us.”

It is an unlikely outcome given Heston’s bumpy road to this point.

Heston was drafted in the 47th round of the 2007 MLB Amateur Draft by the Twins, out of Seminole Community College in Florida. He did not sign and remained at Seminole. He was drafted in the 29th round of the 2008 Draft by the Nationals, but passed on the Nats to attend East Carolina.

The Giants drafted him in the 12th round of the 2009 Draft, and Heston signed. His pro career got off to a bumpy start, going 1-5 in Rookie ball in 2009 and 5-13 for Class A Augusta in 2010.

But things started to come together in 2011 when he went 12-4 with 3.16 ERA for Class A San Jose. He went 9-8 with a 2.24 ERA and 1.103 WHIP for Double-A Richmond in 2012, earning an Eastern League All-Star nod.

He was added to the Giants’ 40-man roster that offseason, but success didn’t follow him to Triple-A in 2013. He went 7-6 with a 5.80 ERA in 2013 and was released in August of that year to create room on the 40-man roster.

Heston re-signed with the Giants and went 12-9 with a 3.38 ERA for Triple-A Fresno last season, earning a September call-up. He started the final game of the 2014 regular season, giving up three runs in four innings against the Rockies.

He spent the past offseason bulking up — something he said the Giants have been pushing him to do for several off seasons — and it paid off this spring. He impressed the Giants, going 1-0 with 2.40 ERA with 10 strikeouts and one walk in 15 innings.

He was set to open the Triple-A season with Sacramento when Cain’s trip to the DL prompted his call-up to face the Diamondbacks.

Where does it go from here? Well, we’ll get a better idea on Monday.

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